Dan Monteiro is your Little East Men’s Soccer Defensive Player of the Week – Julian Borges

Dan Monteiro is your Little East Men’s Soccer Defensive Player of the Week

Julian Borges

Sports Editor

Rhode Island College senior midfielder Dan Monteiro was awarded the title of Little East Men’s Soccer Defensive Player of the Week following an impressive performance at the Roger Williams Squad Locker Invitational.                                                 Prior to his match against Amherst, Monteiro had started in the two games that Rhode Island College played at the invitational. The first game saw the Anchormen fall 2-0 to Clark University while the second game saw RIC defeat Montclair State, a nationally ranked team, 2-0 in the competition’s finale. For his efforts in controlling midfield in both games, Monteiro was named to the All-Tournament Team. He had also recorded a total of six shots at the invitational.                                            Congratulations, Dan!

Anchorwomen cruise past Fisher 5-1 in first win of season – Julian Borges

Anchorwomen cruise past Fisher 5-1 in first win of season

Julian Borges

Sports Editor

 

The Fisher Falcons (1-2) were able to put only 10 players on the field for their soccer match against Rhode Island College. One of these players was the goalie. The Anchorwomen (1-1) took advantage of the Falcons’ depleted roster in order to control the game.

Anchorwomen goal-scorers of the game included sophomore forward Brittany DeGrooth , Westerly, RI, freshman forward Breanne Ford, Schenectady, NY, and freshman forward Madyson Christian, Douglas, MA, as well as senior midfielder Jaclyn Greenman, Waterford, CT, who notched two goals in the victory.

Sophomore midfielder Eleni Grammas, Cranston, RI, freshman forward Alexandra Natale, Ledyard, CT, and junior midfielder Stephanie Ricci, Smithfield, RI, each had assists in the win.

Freshman goalkeeper Amber-Marie Francois, Warwick, RI, made three saves before junior goalie Brianna Sousa, Warwick, RI, relieved her for the final 18 minutes of the game. Sousa made one save during her appearance.

RIC held a 52-7 advantage in shots and a 15-2 margin in corner kicks. The Anchorwomen also held a 30-1 advantage in shots during the first half with a similar result in the second half with a 22-6 ratio.

Twenty somethings date for crap – Angelina Denomme

Twenty somethings date for crap
Angelina Denomme

Opinions Editor

 

If the switch to the nonverbal communication form of texting has had any negative effects on interpersonal relationships, it’s that all of the rules of dating have been completely thrown out the window. In middle and high schools, classmates have had entire relationships solely through instant messaging and then later through texting without ever once hitting the dinner-and-a-movie scene. Therefore, it may have been delusional to think that twenty-somethings would be better than fifteen year olds at asking each other out.

Asking someone to “hang out sometime” with no preset time, date or activity is not asking someone out on a date. Nor is spending twenty minutes via text trying to pin down a time, place and activity. If you are asking someone out on date, have a plan and follow through; it shows interest and a little forethought. Remember, preparedness is attractive.

Dates do not occur during the hours of 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. This means no brunch, no lunch, and no early dinners. There is nothing sexy about pancakes and eggs unless it’s the morning after a really good night out.

Asking someone to a party you’re throwing is not a date. This is the kind of invite you throw out to your friends or someone you’re vaguely familiar with in an effort to get more people to show up at your house with beer and chips. It’s especially not a date if the person you’re inviting to the party won’t know anybody at said party.

Finally, and most importantly, asking someone out on the same day as said date is offensive. Texting someone at 7 p.m. on a Friday and asking them to hang out in an hour shows no regard for the other person. Treating someone you’re interested in as a last minute choice or an afterthought isn’t how you’re going to get them to be interested in you in return.

Dating should not be an easily-skipped practice. The rules aren’t all that complicated, yet so many people are forgoing the entire experience for a less personal and quicker variation. The whole point of dating is to spend time with someone in whom you’re interested in a romantic setting. Dating isn’t about doing “friend” things in low pressure environments. It’s the strain and the uncomfortableness of trying to navigate eating a cheeseburger in front of the person you’re trying to impress that will grow a relationship or not. To get to know someone in that setting is vital to deciding if you even want a relationship with the other person. No matter how many hours are spent texting or FaceTiming, a relationship will never begin to really develop and grow until there’s good old fashioned face-to-face contact.  No matter how advanced technology gets or how real it all feels, computers will never be able to replicate that first date kind of experience.

 

Summer magic is ever fleeting – Angelina Denomme

Summer magic is ever fleeting

Angelina Denomme

Opinions Editor

 

Summer is, without a doubt, the best three months of the year. The days are long with the feeling of the sun on your skin, and the nights are loud with crickets and the sounds of cars racing through the streets with too-loud music. Every once in awhile, a breeze will blow through an open window and send a sweet reprieve from the suffocating heat. The world begins to bloom: the trees, the flowers and the people. Everyone is barefoot, happy and nobody is worrying about pedicures or callouses on their feet. The world is finally alive again, or maybe that’s just the lie that media has fed us our entire lives.

Remember that early 2000’s baseball movie, with “7th Heaven” darling Jessica Biel and teen heartthrob Freddie Prinze Jr., called “Summer Catch”? It’s one of those classic summer romance movies where sports lingo appeases the boys, and Freddie Prinze Jr.’s tight white uniform pants make all the girls swoon. Beside the obvious romance plotline, “Summer Catch” tells a bigger story about how magical summer can be. Anything can happen. You can meet your true love, get on the baseball team of your dreams and end up playing for the Phillies. All of this happens during bonfires on the beach sitting in a circle of on driftwood and drinking beer out of cans while some guy strums on his guitar. The camera pans out, and it’s a perfectly clear night. The stars are shining, the laughs are loud and the music is lingering. Except in real life, the beer is skunk, the fire is smoky and everyone has to be at work in the morning.

Summer nights are more likely spent mindlessly scrolling through dashboards of carefully curated people or watching hours upon hours of television shows you’ve probably already seen. Every once in a blue moon, a friend will call you up, everyone in the group’s schedules have aligned, and you all somehow meet down at the beach for a few hours. It’s all laughter and bottles of white wine. It’s magic, but just for one night. Magic has a funny way of being sporadic though, it isn’t one of those things that exists in strings long enough to get the guy and get drafted onto a professional baseball team. The media just hasn’t caught up. It’s still living in that ideal world where twenty-somethings  were carefree and reckless and love was always in the air. Nowadays, summer is more about managing expectations set by movies like “Summer Catch” than managing social calendars. Every year, summer is spent just trying not to be a complete bore, but at the end of the three months we all roll back to campus with only a few sporadic moments of magic to show for it.

On guidance and self-motivation – Shane Inman

On guidance and self-motivation

Shane Inman

Anchor Editor

Only 14% of students at Rhode Island College graduate within four years. To many, this is old news; a quaint fact about our little school to be met with rueful laughs and the shaking of heads. But with the start of a new school year, and the concurrent influx of freshmen, comes yet another opportunity to address this frankly unsettling statistic.

As anyone who has been at RIC for long can tell you, the root of this problem lies in the guidance offered to students. Advisors are well-meaning, but many are not trained in the skills necessary to actually advise, and this too often leads to a lack of reliable direction for students to follow on the road to graduation. People take unnecessary classes, don’t take enough classes, or realize too late that they want to change majors and end up staying at RIC for a lot longer than they’d anticipated.

That said, we can’t pin all the blame on other people. At the end of the day, we as students are responsible for our own academics and need to do our best to sidestep the aforementioned issues.

Academic awareness is the key factor in this dilemma. Simply being informed about the requirements of your major is not just a good idea, it’s also very much your responsibility as a student. Even the best advisors should be there to tweak and supplement your existing academic plan, not build it from scratch because you couldn’t be bothered. Keep an eye on your transcripts, double– and triple– check your major and general education requirements on the RIC website; try to stay generally  informed about the gritty details of how you get from enrollment to graduation. The “class search” function on MyRic is a bit obtuse, but using it to plan classes well in advance can be the difference between a focused four years and an uncertain six. You don’t need to know your entire course plan from freshman to senior year right off the bat, but it’s a good idea to at least keep the big picture in mind.

Once you have the awareness, the next thing you need in order to keep your stay as short as possible is the motivation to follow through. The fact is this:  maintaining your academic plan with minimal guidance is hard work. There will be details you miss, there will be times when you may have to scrap and rearrange half of your schedule, but in the end, knowing that you are in charge of your future and being able to trust that you are up to the challenge is worth the extra work required. We can spend all day complaining about the shortcomings of RIC’s advising program, but it is ultimately up to us, and no one else, whether we graduate in a timely fashion or get bogged down in planning errors. They say that if you want something done, you’ve gotta do it yourself, and nowhere is that more true than at Rhode Island College.

Student activities take on Student Union Ballroom – Samantha Scetta

Student activities take on Student Union Ballroom

Samantha Scetta

Ads Manager

 

Let’s face it: college can be horrendously lonely when one commutes to campus and has no friends to eat lunch with, or to join on coffee runs in between classes. Many of us have been in this boat at some point during our college career. An ideal solution to the ever-impending loneliness one encounters at a mainly commuter campus such as Rhode Island College would be to join a club with like minded students.

There truly is an activity for every student. At Student Activities Day last Wednesday, The Student Union Ballroom nearly reached it’s maximum capacity with students representing clubs, activities and, of course, students looking to join. Besides free Del’s and more candy than one could possibly eat, there were many friendly students in The SU Ballroom, ready to offer a plethora of information about the clubs they were representing.

Organizations such as the National Student Speech Language and Hearing Association are looking for members to join and advocate for disabilities like Autism and Down Syndrome, attend conventions and get real life experience in speech pathology. There are clubs suited to most, if not all, college majors, and offer valuable real life experience in one’s chosen field. Student Nurses Association, Bachelor of Social Work Organization, and The Ocean State Film Society are just a few of the many clubs that one can choose to join when looking to get actively involved on campus.

Aside from organizations suited to one’s major, clubs exist to just simply try something new, such as Greek life. Jackie Pringle, a member of Theta Phi Alpha sorority, is leading a “Color Me Theta Pi” fundraiser in late October to benefit The Gloria Gemma Foundation.

Don’t let those tuition dollars go to waste! Ballroom Dance club offers free dance lessons on Sunday evenings for those who are interested in learning a few dances to impress family members at weddings and other events. Spoken is a club for the poets lingering amongst the masses on campus; join them on Wednesdays at noon to share and read poetry. The Cape Verdean Student Association is always looking for new members to learn a little bit about Cabo Verde culture—and no, you do not have to be Cape Verdean to join.

For gamers to history fanatics, a club exists for everyone. Although joining something new can be very difficult and sometimes even nerve wrecking, one should never let this deter them from an opportunity to make new friends, do something beneficial for the community, and have a good time at RIC.

Race tightens as candidates spar over worthiness – Taylor Dame

Race tightens as candidates spar over worthiness

Taylor Dame

News Editor

 

A new poll out this week shows Republican nominee Donald Trump gaining on his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton. Trump has come closer and closer to Clinton in the last few polls with both candidates polling in the 40s. Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson is polling at just above 10%, while Green Party candidate Jill Stein is polling at around 3%. Clinton’s poll numbers were at their highest after the Democratic convention, as Trump got into a feud with a gold star family. The post-convention bump is wearing off though, and Clinton’s extremely low favorability ratings are preventing her from sweeping into the White House.

Clinton might not be worrying too much, as many experts agree that her path to getting the 270 votes from the Electoral College needed to be president is much easier than it is for Trump. Clinton has significant leads in swing states like Virginia and Colorado, and Trump faces a tough battle to win over Pennsylvania, but fares much better in Ohio and Florida. Trump is also having issues in traditionally Republican states like Georgia, Missouri, and Arizona, where he is tied or only has a slim one or two point lead. In Rhode Island, a traditionally blue state, Clinton leads by a mere three points, 44% to Trump’s 41%.

In an effort to secure more votes, both candidates attended MSNBC’s Commander-in-Chief forum, during which they were asked tough questions by moderator Matt Lauer and a group of veterans. Question topics ranged from trustworthiness in handling classified intelligence and the handling of the Iraq War to sexual assaults in the military. Both candidates attempted to explain why they would be the best person to lead the United States armed forces. Clinton cited her work as Secretary of State, and Trump cited his endorsements from retired generals and admirals. Both candidates have received endorsements from retired generals and admirals recently. Clinton has 95 endorsements to Trump’s 88.

New president welcomes new students – Taylor Dame

New president welcomes new students

Taylor Dame

News Editor

 

Incoming freshmen gathered in the quad on a beautiful late summer day sporting different colored wristbands that represented their major, and were officially welcomed to Rhode Island College. Holly Shadoian, the Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs, was the master of ceremony, and kicked off the event by introducing the students and staff who made the day possible and explaining to the new faces that they are here to help.

The first person to address the new students was the new president of Student Community Government Jose Rosario. Rosario encouraged the crowd of students to explore outside their comfort zones and try new things, saying that he “firmly believes that you can accomplish greatness.” He also explained that RIC students are very lucky to have a group of faculty, staff and students who are fighting for everyone to succeed.

Shadoian sang an excellent  RIC orientation version of Rixton’s “Me and my Broken Heart” that changed the words to explain what incoming freshmen should do and what is expected of them.

The students were then addressed by the new president at RIC, Frank Sánchez. Traditionally, a faculty member is selected to address freshmen at convocation, but the timing of a new president and the new students could not be passed up. He spoke about how RIC graduates are in an elite group, as fewer than seven percent of people in the world have college degrees. Sánchez urged all the incoming students to strive to be a part of the small group by listening to others who have come before, who were successful in their studies.

According to Sánchez, there are four things that make people successful in college: firstly, find your strengths, talents and passions. Secondly, learn how to manage your time. Thirdly, challenge yourself in a variety of ways, and finally, have the strength to persist. These four things will lay the foundation for a successful college life and a successful life outside the college environment.

Secondary education and english major Sarah Hackworth found the experience of the convocation to be good. She felt “more welcome,” and the event showed that “even though they are terrified, the freshmen are not alone.”

The event was ended with the hanging of the class of 2020 plaque behind the anchor in the quad, and the consumption of many ice cream sandwiches.

President Sánchez takes the helm – Louisa D’Ovidio, Shane Inman

President Sánchez takes the helm

Louisa D’Ovidio

Editor-in-Chief

Shane Inman

Managing Editor

 

Rhode Island College has welcomed a new President to its campus. This fall, Frank Sánchez, a longtime proponent of widely-available higher learning, has begun in earnest his duties as the head of the college. The Anchor newspaper sat down with RIC’s newest leader to pick his brain about the issues that face our campus today.

Sánchez began by talking about what attracted him to Rhode Island College in particular, citing the institution’s “deep ethic of care about students.” He went on to illustrate RIC’s impressive ranking regarding factors such as post-graduation social mobility, pointing out that it is “the best in New England” in these respects.

He did concede, however, that “a lot of things can be done better.” Sánchez explained that he hopes to use his previous experience in building up neglected institutions to remedy some of the failings of RIC. The president mentioned inconsistency in advising as being a major concern in need of addressing. He made it clear that he is aware of the sometimes contradictory and confusing direction met by students, and described his vision for the service. “It should be precision advising,” he said, before going on to explain that he hopes to “invest in providing a higher-quality academic advising experience for students.”

The new performance-based funding bill and its potential negative effects were also among the items addressed by the president, who said he is “actively involved” with working out the details of the bill’s implementation. Sánchez acknowledged that “one size fits all does not fit all,” and said, “if you focus completely on four-year graduation rates you’re really missing out on the purpose” of schools such as RIC, with its high population of non-traditional students. He explained that he understands the unique situation of RIC’s non-traditional students, and wants to play to their strengths when it comes to the bill’s performance evaluations. “I want to be held accountable,” he said, “for creating a better student experience, with more experiential learning opportunities. Really training students with portable skills so they’re better prepared for the world of work.”

Experiential learning proved to be a major point of interest for the new president. “Every student at RIC should leave with the degree and the skills to have choices,” he said, declaring that RIC students should have the ability to “be effective at a state, national, or international stage.” To this end, Sánchez said he is exploring the idea of requiring the development of soft skills, such as those picked up through undergraduate research projects, senior capstones, internships, and the like. “I think most of our students are already doing it,” he said, pointing to RAs and student officers, and suggesting that “those things should qualify for experiential learning.”

On a more administrative front, Sánchez expressed a distinct interest in avoiding the issues of a lack of transparency and community which have arisen among faculty and staff in the past. “I’m a big proponent of trying to strengthen this sense of connection and this sense of belonging with our faculty and staff,” he said, while describing the motivation behind the recent faculty and staff barbecue and convocation events. “I’m a big believer that if we’re working well together and communicate better, it serves the students better.”

In spite of his clear knowledge of many of the technical aspects of the college, the president made a point of the fact that he is still learning about RIC, and wants to hear from members of the college community. “I’ve gotta listen,” he said, “I’ve gotta gain perspective, I’ve gotta learn the historical and the cultural and the institutional context before we can really chart our future together.” Sánchez stated that it is for this purpose that he has launched a listening tour, and will be holding numerous forums in the months to come. In addition to these more formal events, he seems to also be enjoying his first exposure to Rhode Island’s special culture, enthusiastically describing Del’s Lemonade as being “off the charts.”

Frank Sánchez has a lot of plans for the future of Rhode Island College, from short-term changes and repairs to a longer-term awareness of the “footprint” of the institution. Whether or not his vision is one which can be achieved is something time alone will tell, but for  the moment, he appears very optimistic about the future of the college. In the meantime, students are sure to see a lot of him around campus, as he does his very best to create and maintain a presence within the RIC community. From the editors here at The Anchor, we wish the president and his administration the best of luck in the coming year.

Kane to Student Government: “you are not a business” – Taylor Dame

Kane to Student Government: “you are not a business”

Taylor Dame

News Editor

 

Dr. Scott Kane, the interim Vice-President of Student Affairs spoke positively to the members of Student Community Government during his administration updates. “There is more of a sense of college life so far this year than I can remember. I hope we can build on that opportunity.” He went on to give some advice to the brand new government. “You have a lot of money, and with a lot of money, you can do a lot of things, and the reality is that the money you take in this year should be spent on the students who gave the money this year.” Kane explained that, as SCG members are the stewards of student money, they should be using it. He also said that SCG is “not a business, you are not always trying to operate for a profit.” He encouraged the members to use the money to help students by contributing to their education.

Kane spoke about the bookstore and how students seem to be responding positively to it being run by Barnes & Noble. He explained that Barnes & Noble will have regular meetings with a Bookstore Advisory Committee to get feedback. As part of the deal to take over managing the bookstore, Barnes & Noble set aside some money for textbook scholarships so that students could get free books. “We haven’t quite worked out the details on how we are going to distribute those scholarships. You can see more information about that at the actual rollout of the textbook scholarship program as early as this semester, certainly for the spring semester.”

The new president of SCG, Jose Rosario, addressed the body and asked them to get more people involved by joining parliament or one of the committees. Rosario also explained that anyone wanting a table for the Student Organization Carnival should speak to Vice-President Maria Zapasnik. Zapasnik told the body that elections for Class of 2020 government positions are going to be on September 28, and that anyone interested in running should visit the SCG offices in the Student Union on the 13th through the 20th.

Those interested in learning more about or joining SCG should visit their website at ricscg.org. The next meeting is September 14th in Student Union room 307 at 7:15 p.m.